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Youth Ambassadors Trip Report: Old Growth Forest and Salmon

February 21st, 2018 | Posted by in Youth Adventures

The Youth Leadership Ambassadors program is an extension of our Youth Leadership Adventures summer program. The goal of the program is to further develop leadership and outdoor skills, facilitate service and stewardship in our local communities and ecosystems, and provide college preparedness support to high school students from Skagit and Whatcom County. While serving as Ambassadors, students will participate in work parties, attend field trip and receive 15 hours of college access curriculum.

Appearing for the first time on Chattermarks is Youth Ambassador Stepheny Lopez, a student at Mount Vernon High School. In this post she shares her experience of learning about old growth forest at Rockport State Park and eagle watching in Marblemount. Enjoy! 

On the early morning of January 6, 2018, nine dedicated North Cascade Institute Ambassadors attended their first Youth Ambassadors field trip of the year. Ellie and Amy, our group’s mentors, took us eagle watching in Marblemount. Many of us in the group were given the opportunity to try and learn new things; we also gained awareness about job and career opportunities that can help our success, and inform others about our environment.

Ellie Price posing as an eagle at Rockport State Park; artwork by Don Smith

Our first stop was to Rockport State Park, thirty minutes east on Highway 20 from the North Cascade Visitor Center in Sedro-Woolley, Washington. While at Rockport, the first thing we did was gear up with warm clothing. For many of us, we did not know how much clothing to wear, due to it being our first time hiking in cold weather, but it was all definitely worth the experience. Emily Jankowski then joined us during our arrival to help chaperone the field trip. She is an AmeriCorps volunteer from Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group. Then Rockport State Park’s Interpretive Specialist, Amos Almy, guided us on a half-mile walk around the park, and informed us of the area’s natural history throughout our time on the trail.

» Continue reading Youth Ambassadors Trip Report: Old Growth Forest and Salmon

Mark Scherer: Artist in Residence

January 26th, 2018 | Posted by in Life at the Learning Center

Mark Scherer participated in the Creative Residence Program at the North Cascades Institute this December, joining the tradition of poets, naturalists, dancers and researchers who have participated in the past.

In Mark’s own words:

My home is Stehekin, Washington. The medium I work with most often is wood. I’m not a carver except in the most rudimentary way. I think of myself as a “shaper”. I use saws, files, sanding tools, and sometimes paint and glue to make my sculpture. Here are two examples of past work.

“Feets” 4′ diameter. Photo by Mark Scherer

“Twice” 17″ x 6″ x 2″. Photo by Mark Scherer

At the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center, I’m working with ideas that are new to me, ideas addressing climate change. I like to make things that are pleasing and humorous. Climate Change isn’t pleasing or humorous. It scares me. If art has the power to move us, to change perceptions, to give us insights we might not otherwise see, then why not use whatever “art power” I can muster to encourage thoughtful consideration of our individual and shared culpability for where we’re taking the climate? During my Creative Residency I’m beginning tentative, “baby steps” toward that goal. I hope you’ll stay tuned.

» Continue reading Mark Scherer: Artist in Residence

2017 Northwest Youth Leadership Summit

January 18th, 2018 | Posted by in Youth Adventures

The Northwest Youth Leadership Summit, now in its eighth year, is for young adults (ages 14-22) in the Pacific Northwest who have participated in outdoor, leadership, and/or stewardship programs. In 2017, graduate student Amy Sanchez attended the event, led a presentation, and enjoyed the festivities. 

In Amy’s own words:

As a student in the Graduate M.Ed. program, there are a number of opportunities to learn beyond schoolwork. My Work Study position as a Youth Leadership Adventures Graduate Assistant has been no exception to that. After returning from our Natural History Field course in the second week of October, I jumped into the swift moving river of planning the 2017 Northwest Youth Leadership Summit. This year was the eighth  Summit to take place, and the second time it’s been hosted at The Mountaineers in Seattle, Washington.

A group picture taken at the end of the day to commemorate a successful Summit; photo by Jodi Broughton.

Leading up to the Summit, I had the pleasure of working with and learning from an amazing team of individuals of staff from the North Cascades Institute, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie Forest Service, and Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. They provided  insight into the immense amount of work that goes into coordinating an event for 150 young adults. Participants were given the chance to reconnect with fellow peers, many who had participated in outdoor programs, as well as with potential employers, internship opportunities, and college representatives. In addition to the  to networking, the Summit provided folks with workshops that included a wide range of topics and activities including a college prep presentation, an obstacle challenge course, and opportunities to discuss identity in the outdoors.

Crystal Sierra (left) and Alicia Raftery (right) excited for their chance to emcee the day’s events; photo by Jodi Broughton

We tried to make the Summit event as accessible to participants as possible.  All participants were provided with access to transportation both to and from the Summit. Shuttles and busses picked up groups from as far north as Bellingham, and as far south as Tukwila. My day began at 5:30am as I prepared myself to fulfill my role as a shuttle driver. After making sure I went through all of the safety checks, I made my way to the first pick up spot of the “Upriver Shuttle” in Rockport.

» Continue reading 2017 Northwest Youth Leadership Summit

Natural History Field-Excursion: A Grinnell Journal Entry for a Day with David Moskowitz

January 2nd, 2018 | Posted by in Field Excursions

This post is the third of a 3-part series describing graduate students’ ten-day field excursion to the Methow Valley, as part of their fall Natural History Course. Click here for all three parts. 

On October 6, 2017, the 17th cohort of graduate students ended their 10-day field course by meeting with wildlife tracker and photographer, David Moskowitz, to learn more about tracking. This blog post was written in the Grinnell Method of keeping a naturalist journal by graduate student Liz Grewal.

06 October 2017

Left Skalitude resort at 806, 36°F Sparse, cirrus clouds were observed.

Skalitude Retreat Center, Okanongan County, Washington

Route: Leaving Skalitude Retreat Center,  2.1 mi on Smith Canyon Road, 3.7 mi on Libby Creek

Road, 9.3 mi on SR 153 North, 2.3 mi on SR 20 West. Detour to Cinnamon Twisp for coffee and pastries: right on to E 2nd Ave, left North Glover St. Continue on SR 20 West for 16.9 miles, pull off on left side of highway, just downstream from Weiman Bridge.

9:40 We met with David Moskowitz for introductions. D. Moskowitz has over 20 years of experience in wildlife tracking and has written a field guide to wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The site is a restoration project by the Yakama Nation in efforts to promote habitat and restore populations of native salmon in the Colombia River.

» Continue reading Natural History Field-Excursion: A Grinnell Journal Entry for a Day with David Moskowitz

A Year in Review: Most-read Chattermarks Posts of 2017

December 29th, 2017 | Posted by in Institute News

2017 was a big year for the North Cascades Institute, and we’d like to thank YOU for taking the time to read all about it on our Chattermarks blog. We try to make sure that everything posted here is in support of our mission: to inspire and empower environmental stewardship for all through transformative experiences in nature.

What were your favorite posts of 2017? Below is a list of our five, most-read Chattermarks posts of the year. Scroll down to find out what is number one, and to relive some of the memories from the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center.

#5

Photo Roundup: April 16 2017

This post features a rockslide over highway 20, pictures of a black bear at Diablo, the graduation ceremony of the 15th Cohort of graduate students, and adventure!

Then editor, Angela Burlile wrote:

On Wednesday, we woke to news that a rockslide occurred on Highway 20, between Newhalem and Diablo. Unlike the avalanche that extended the stay of Henry M. Jackson high school, students participating in Mountain School were able to leave that day. The road remained closed to traffic into the weekend while WSDOT crews worked to move and break up the large pieces of rock that had fallen onto the highway.

» Continue reading A Year in Review: Most-read Chattermarks Posts of 2017

Plight of the Pollinators

November 30th, 2017 | Posted by in Naturalist Notes

By Kay Gallagher, graduate student in the Institute’s 16th cohort

Imagine yourself walking down to the local summer farmer’s market down by the town square. It’s the first warm day and you cannot wait to make a large juicy bowl of fruit salad for lunch. Summer time in the valley is your favorite, all winter you have eagerly anticipated the first fruits of the season. With your list in hand that you scribbled down this morning, juicy red tomatoes, green zucchini, bright yellow summer squash, perfectly round peaches, you set off.


Produce from the local Twisp Farmers Market. Photo courtesy of Kay Gallagher

After a short walk, you arrive at the farmers’ market, ready to fill your basket to the brim. You walk around and notice the usual vendors. The local bakery selling loaves of freshly made artisan bread, the various craftsmen selling their woolen blankets and knit scarves, the goat farmers selling their savory cheeses and assorted dairy products. Then you notice there are no fruit stands. No vegetable stands. There isn’t so much as a rogue berry in sight. Where are the fruits of summer you have been dreaming about since that first warm day of spring? It’s almost as if they have vanished overnight. They’re not there.


The colorful mosaic landscape of Patterson Mountain. Photo courtesy of Kay Gallagher

You leave the farmer’s market quite perplexed, and decide to hike your favorite summer trail instead. On your drive to the trailhead you can picture the lush mountain sides and vast fields full of a colorful array of wildflowers from last summer, you can visualize the river coursing its way through the landscape in the valley below, with animal life whirring and scattered about. You arrive at the trailhead, and hop out of the car, eager for your adventure in the colorful mosaic. As you begin to hike, you notice that things aren’t as colorful as they used to be. There aren’t nearly as many wildflowers, the earth seems dry and crumbly with serious signs of erosion along the river bank below. The landscape is made up of various shades of brown. The air is noticeably quieter, without the hums and whizzing of winged insects flying about. The chatter of birds is absent, and the silence seems a little eerie. It’s a little too quiet. Something is missing, and then you realize …” Where have all the pollinators gone?”

» Continue reading Plight of the Pollinators

Weekly Photo Roundup: November 19 2017

November 19th, 2017 | Posted by in Photography

Every weekend I will post photos collected from various NCI graduate students and staff. Please enjoy this glimpse into our everyday lives here in the North Cascades.

It’s that time of the year where the precip rolls in and you either embrace it, or settle down inside for learning and traditions. Graduate students in the M.Ed Residency are currently doing a little bit of both as the days get shorter, and the sky a bit grayer.

Pictured: Zoe Wadkins, Tanner Johnson, and Marissa Bluestein

Taking advantage of the season’s first heavy snowfall, graduate students in the 17th Cohort made their way to Mt. Baker during the weekend for a celebratory snowshoe. Woohoo to Snowvember!

Tanner Johnson and Marissa Bluestein having a good time

They toasted trail hot cocoa to another successful year of snowpack. Some even went skiing on Mt. Baker – one of the reasons why they were drawn to the North Cascades in the first place. Below are photos from their adventure.

Nate Trachte, C17, Becky Moore, C16, and Naturalist Natasha Way go touring up Mt. Baker enjoying the fresh powder a week before the resort opens; photo by Charlee Corra

» Continue reading Weekly Photo Roundup: November 19 2017