Chattermarks

From North Cascades Institute

Search Chattermarks

North Cascades on Instagram

Archives

Natural History Field-Excursion: A Grinnell Journal Entry for a Day with David Moskowitz

January 2nd, 2018 | Posted by in Field Excursions

This post is the third of a 3-part series describing graduate students’ ten-day field excursion to the Methow Valley, as part of their fall Natural History Course. Click here for all three parts. 

On October 6, 2017, the 17th cohort of graduate students ended their 10-day field course by meeting with wildlife tracker and photographer, David Moskowitz, to learn more about tracking. This blog post was written in the Grinnell Method of keeping a naturalist journal by graduate student Liz Grewal.

06 October 2017

Left Skalitude resort at 806, 36°F Sparse, cirrus clouds were observed.

Skalitude Retreat Center, Okanongan County, Washington

Route: Leaving Skalitude Retreat Center,  2.1 mi on Smith Canyon Road, 3.7 mi on Libby Creek

Road, 9.3 mi on SR 153 North, 2.3 mi on SR 20 West. Detour to Cinnamon Twisp for coffee and pastries: right on to E 2nd Ave, left North Glover St. Continue on SR 20 West for 16.9 miles, pull off on left side of highway, just downstream from Weiman Bridge.

9:40 We met with David Moskowitz for introductions. D. Moskowitz has over 20 years of experience in wildlife tracking and has written a field guide to wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. The site is a restoration project by the Yakama Nation in efforts to promote habitat and restore populations of native salmon in the Colombia River.

» Continue reading Natural History Field-Excursion: A Grinnell Journal Entry for a Day with David Moskowitz

ThunderCrkSml

Creative Residency with Sharon Birzer, natural history illustrator

December 6th, 2014 | Posted by in Naturalist Notes

By Sharon Birzer, artist and natural history illustrator

My Creative Residency journal  @ North Cascades Learning Center, Diablo Lake, July 11-18, 2014

July 11-13

The first three days I interacted with a class held at North Cascades Institute’s Learning Center on lichens: “Frog’s Pelt, Pixie Cup and Old Man’s Beard: Lichens of the North Cascades.” Taught by Daphne Stone, the weekend was rich with lectures, hikes and lichen identification. The class hiked to Rainy Lake and Washington Pass. We also took a hike up a service road to Buster Brown, a rocky outcropping covered in lichens.
This is a group that I brought back to look at under the dissecting scope and draw. This group has two lichens- Cladonia cervicornus with the double cup and Cladonia bellidiflora, and 2 mosses–Racomitrium elongatum and Polytrichum piliferum.

 

UmbrellLichenBIRZER

ClassNCI2

July 14 Thunder Creek

Today is hot, in the 90’s. I hiked up Thunder Creek and spent time in the cool shade of an old cedar and Douglas fir forest. A cool breeze wafts down from the mountains and everywhere are ferns, lichens, fungus, and life.
July 15 Sauk Mountain

Hiked up Sauk Mountain today, 4.2 miles, 5537 elevation. Annabelle told me it would be beautiful. Wow. Alpine meadows. Wildflowers abound. Ice fields at the top and glacier lilies and avalanche lilies (finishing) and many others species of wildflowers in full bloom everywhere. Afterwards I was dusty and hot so I dipped into Diablo Lake before working on lichen illustrations.

OldGrowthSml

» Continue reading Creative Residency with Sharon Birzer, natural history illustrator

Winter Natural History

December 17th, 2012 | Posted by in Life at the Learning Center

Every year, graduate students at North Cascades Institute are tasked with keeping a Natural History Journal. At the end of each quarter we turn in ten selected journal entries to our professor. Having recently turned in my fall journal, natural history has been on my mind.

If you’re like me, you have a lot of questions when first given this assignment: What is a “natural history journal” anyway? What if I’m not good at drawing? What constitutes “one entry”? What do I write about? Do I have to sit outside in the cold for hours trying to draw and make observations about plants? Is it supposed to be scientific?

On a chilly December day, all of us in Cohort 12 sat down with the Institute’s Curriculum Coordinator and resident Amazing Artist, Katie Roloson, for a lesson in nature art and nature journaling.

 

a dusting of snow makes for a cold day outside

» Continue reading Winter Natural History