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Photo by Pablo McLoud

Pablo McLoud: Artist in Residence

November 22nd, 2017 | Posted by in Life at the Learning Center

Pablo McLoud participated in the North Cascades Institute’s Creative Residence Program this October, joining the tradition of poets, naturalists, dancers and researchers who have participated in the past.

Pablo is self-described as “an amateur photographer using Canon cameras.” He prides himself on taking photographs from a perspective and vantage point that many find original. For some of his photos, his unique “slant” on ordinary subjects elicits responses like “Wow! I’ve never seen a picture like that before.” Without the use of digital manipulation in a majority of his work, Pablo’s images deliver the purity of the event in a special moment in time.

Pablo’s mantra is “If you don’t explore, you’ll never discover.”

And he definitely took the time to explore during his Residency experience! Below are some of his beautiful photos from around North Cascades National Park and surrounding wilderness areas.

Photo by Pablo McLoud

Leave Me Be; photo by Pablo McLoud

Photo by Pablo McLoud

Fall Mountain Splendor; photo by Pablo McLoud

Photo by Pablo McLoud

Glacial Textures; photo by Pablo McLoud

Photo by Pablo McLoud

Winter Wonderland; photo by Pablo McLoud

In Pablo’s own words:

During my time as a Creative Resident at the North Cascades Environmental Learning Center, I have made friends, had fabulous experiences, and created memories to last lifetimes. During my month-long adventure I have hiked over 200 miles, collected over 3000 photographs, and learned, shared, and been a part of the ELC community.

 

The Residency experience has been enriching and gratifying, fulfilling and inspiring, and I am thankful to everyone for their support, interest, and generosity. I leave with a new appreciation for our wilderness environment, and dedicate myself to the preservation and protection of these unique mountain resources.

 

My stay culminated in a slide-show presentation for guests, students, and staff. Additionally, many more photos from the North Cascades and other worldwide locations may be viewed on my website at www.pablophotography.com.

Thank you Pablo for inspiring us with your creative work!

(Top photo) Wispy Wonder by Artist in Residence, Pablo McLoud

Outline of a Hollow Bird: Poems by Evan Holmstrom

December 20th, 2016 | Posted by in Odds & Ends

As is evidenced by the rich cadre of writers who have found inspiration in the North Cascades, this region is almost eerily conducive to writing. Maybe it’s the short, bright blinks of summer or the fog and rain always promising mystery. And not only writing, but simply reflection on life in its splendor, difficulty, and variety is greatly facilitated by the natural character of this area.

This year as a Naturalist Educator turned Creative Resident I’ve been fortunate to develop a familiarity with the North Cascades. Through teaching we deepen our own relationship to the subject and the particular spirit of learning that we teach 5th grade students here is one of wonder and curiosity. What a convenient way to remind ourselves of that essential inclination. In my instruction I encourage not just creative expression, but creative im-pression as well. That is, I always remind students to be aware of just how much they’re taking in as they go about Mountain School. As a creative person, that causes me to accumulate mountains of inspiration alongside the students.

For my residency I’m finishing a book of poems called Outline of a Hollow Bird. It’s essentially my poetry journal for this year refined into a chapbook. My hunch is that it documents some personal growth and transformation. There is a great trove of wonder just beyond the grasp of our words. As a poet, that provides me with a zesty challenge. My book is intended to begin in the trope of the solitary wilderness poet, flap its wings through transformative moments, and then to bring the reader to something unfamiliar, just beyond logic.

Many thanks to NCI for employing me this year, and granting me a residency. It’s been quite a year. What I’ve accomplished here adds a rich line to the poem of my life.

The following is a piece taken from ‘Outline of a Hollow Bird’.

Unfelt Wind

ash later paradise is drier

so we      brought fruit

              to burn

 

reclaimed bellyaches while standing against    air

flying air carrying bits of new desert

 

   slash the tether       moist promise

   calling us or maybe just you up

   to mix juice with the dust

 

paradise darkening our faces    we sliced

thinly the vitality to keep

pack the hymnals in alongside

 then in that moment

               where             you’re tottering

 

        rocks purple with seawater

    skyline fractures      it runs into you filled

  with a sudden vacancy     your shards falling

     
tide takes them in



out of the gap in the sound

rhythmic blanks

somebody’s eyes crackle    force light

into themselves    battered ribs   battered recollections

               

the beach aches

    aligns itself

       under the whiteness remembering its mandate

 remade this time of sand

 eroding with the hush       hush

 piled on each other visit our old

                    realm in the reeds

   no longer easier on our bodies

   than kelp and foam

  walking as they do

  from old gates in the trees of legged things

  will they see in the sound

robbed of dimension in that way

we carried out rites

to draw their skin to our currents

 

Written by Evan Holmstrom. Title photograph courtesy of Angela Burlile.

About Evan Holmstrom

No stranger to stunning landscapes, Evan Holmstrom has spent time in Alaska (where he is originally from) and Montana before making his way to the North Cascades. His initial arrival placed him in the upper Skagit, where he spent several months at a meditation center. He then joined the North Cascades Institute to work as a Naturalist Educator last spring. A man of innumerable talents, his skill and knowledge greatly contributed to programs like Mountain School, Conferences and Retreats, Base Camp and Family Getaways. You can find a copy of his work, ‘Outline of a Hollow Bird’, in the Wild Ginger Library at the Environmental Learning Center.  

Patty Dirienzo 2

Connecting the Dots: An Interview with Creative Resident Patty DiRienzo

December 12th, 2016 | Posted by in Life at the Learning Center

As his time at Mountain School comes to an end, 10-year-old Avi writes a letter to himself reflecting on his time in the North Cascades wilderness. Two weeks later students will open these letters at school and remember what was special about their time away from home and out in nature.

All photographs and captions by Patty DiRienzo

This photo was just one of the many images Patty DiRienzo captured during her Creative Residency at the North Cascades Institute Environmental Learning Center. As a photographer, Patty focuses on capturing a person’s connection to environment through relationships with land and community. For her residency, she collected a series of photographic vignettes for her project, “Connecting the Dots”, with the goal of showcasing the relationships that develop between individuals and the North Cascades. Many of her portraits were of 5th grade students participating in the Mountain School program this fall.

I was able to speak with Patty about her residency and work and have transcribed our conversation below. If you would like learn more, please visit her website or Facebook page.

Was there anything in particular about the North Cascades Residency Program that influenced your decision to come out here?

When I lived in Washington, I had always heard about the park and seen pictures and knew it was rugged and a true wilderness. I had initially looked into the National Park Service, they used to have an artist in residency program, and then my research brought me to the ELC Residency. I like the idea of what you all are doing here, bringing and introducing children and adults to this wilderness. Giving them the opportunity to come out and to raise awareness on what they can do to preserve it-that’s why I was interested in coming to the North Cascades Institute. 

Patty Dirienzo 1

Mountain School student Nigel says ‘I love hiking and being out in nature —I think I’m becoming my grandmother. She loves windstorms. And she’s not even afraid of spiders!’

Can you tell me about your history with photography and how you started out?

Photography really started out as my career, over twenty or thirty years ago. I began using film as a newspaper photographer and that’s why I still enjoy telling a story with my pictures. It’s been a transition of course, with photography. I like relating it now more to a community. I also like turning some of my images into more nostalgic looking watercolor type prints. Along the way, I’ve also tried some fine art techniques like handcoloring, black and white pictures, and now polaroid image transfers. I enjoy using these techniques because they all give you different effects and can put a kind of stamp on the work you do. Mine is trying to show how even the past and present can look alike sometimes and those different techniques help me accomplish that. 

Patty Dirienzo 4

“A naturalist leads Andrew and his classmates in a game of ‘camouflage’ during a forest hike at Mountain School. After playing this educational version of hide and seek students come away with a better understanding of the role of predators and prey in the forest.”

 

Patty Dirienzo 3

Isaiah, a fifth-grader from Bellingham, WA listens to a naturalist while on a hike during Mountain School in the North Cascades. “I like getting to learn things about the animals and trees.”

» Continue reading Connecting the Dots: An Interview with Creative Resident Patty DiRienzo

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Growing Roots In The Mountain

November 22nd, 2016 | Posted by in Life at the Learning Center


Guest post by Lauren Danner, historian and writer.

Lauren Danner

The North Cascades have been the focus of Lauren Danner’s research and writing for more than 15 years. While she knows the park intimately on paper and through the memories of those involved in its creation, the Environmental Learning Center creative residency allowed her an opportunity for in-depth exploration of the American Alps, creating a greater physical and emotional connection with the mountains that will resonate authentically in her forthcoming book, Crown Jewel Wilderness: Creating North Cascades National Parks, soon to be published by WSU Press. Lauren is a former college instructor, museum director, and field coordinator of the Lewis & Clark Bicentennial in Washington. The following post has been taken from her website, wildernesswithinher.com, where she writes about the North Cascades, national parks, and wilderness. 

Today is my last full day in the North Cascades, where I’ve spent three weeks as a creative resident at the North Cascade Institute’s Environmental Learning Center (ELC). As I’ve written before, my plan was to hike, write, and soak in the North Cascades, which have been the focus of my research and writing for more than 15 years.

I am simultaneously content that I’ve accomplished my mission and a bit sad to be leaving this remarkable place.

Here’s what a typical day looked like.

I wake up in Diablo, a company town owned by Seattle City Light, which runs the Skagit Hydroelectric Project that provides 20 percent of Seattle’s electricity. The house I’m in is scheduled to be “deconstructed” (a more polite term than “demolished,” I guess) so it’s pretty bare bones.

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Company house in Diablo. Mine is the one on the far right, next to the water tower. Photo by Lauren Danner

In fact, if it weren’t for my housemates, there wouldn’t be much there but beds and a dining room table. But I’ve won the roommate lottery. I’m sharing with staff members Travis, a smiling 30-something uber-athlete and poetic free spirit who works as a naturalist, and Mike, a cerebral student of Marxist economic theory and Magic (the game, not the hobby) who applies his interest in food justice to his work in the ELC’s kitchen as a baker. He uses his sourdough starter to tasty effect, and we’ve enjoyed his bread — and his TV. My first night (and let’s face it, I wasn’t sure how these two would respond to a middle-aged historian being plunked into their midst) we watched Dead Poets Society, squished together on the ancient couch, and I figured everything would be all right.

Each morning, I either drive a few miles or walk to the ELC over the Diablo Dam trail, a short (1.5 miles) path that wakes me up better than coffee.

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Part of the incline railway visible from the Diablo Dam trail. The picture doesn’t do justice to the steep 34.2 degree grade. Photo by Lauren Danner

The first half is long, rocky switchbacks up the side of a low ridge on Sourdough Mountain, where Beat poet Gary Snyder worked as a fire lookout in the 1950s. (The trail to the top of the mountain is known as one of the hardest in in the park, gaining 5,000′ of elevation in five steep miles. Travis makes a point of hiking it once a week.)

» Continue reading Growing Roots In The Mountain