Place-based Learning Course: Paddling the Skagit River

October 16th, 2017 | Posted by in Graduate M.Ed. Program

In August, my cohort and I began our 7-quarter educational journey of earning our Master of Education degree. We are the 17th Cohort of students in the Graduate M.Ed Residency program through the North Cascades Institute and the Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University.

Before beginning our year-long residency at the Learning Center, we engage with the natural and cultural histories of the North Cascades region through field excursions. This intensive six-week course includes canoeing on the Skagit River, learning about local communities and sustainable agriculture, hiking in alpine areas, cohort community formation and a culminating 10-day wilderness backpacking experience. 

Below are pictures from the paddling portion of our Place-based Learning Field Course, along with excerpts from our group journal. Enjoy!

Big Canoe and Community August 9, 2017:

“With a little less smoke in the sky, Cohort 17 loaded into the Salish Dancer for a paddling orientation to Diablo Lake and the surrounding area. Before the canoe left the dock, we heard and saw two peregrine falcons – the fastest member of the animal kingdom – amongst the rocky cliffs of Sourdough Mountain.

The Cohort paddled through the Strait of Juan de P’orca up to the Skagit Gorge, stopping at Hidden Cove for lunch and a quick swim. Upon return to the boom around 1pm, the notorious afternoon winds picked up. Joshua described the winds as the mountains breathing.” – Rachael Grasso

Canoe Training on Diablo – August 16, 2017

“Today was a kind of grab bag, starting with some canoe training on Diablo Lake. Towards the end, it turned a bit dicey as the wind whipped up and caused quite the commotion on the water.” – Tanner Johnson

Learning how to properly carry canoes.

Day One on the Skagit – August 17, 2017

All smiles the first day!

“This afternoon we started our paddle down the Skagit River. After some last minute skills and safety instruction, we set off from the Blue House in Marblemount. Four hours later, we made it 12 miles down river and came to rest at Rockport. Along the way, we learned to eddy out, we traversed several sets of 1 and 2 rapids, and saw an amazing variety of wildlife.

Despite some valiant efforts, no one tipped over. Our chance to practice technique rescues will have to wait for another day.”

Day Two – August 19, 2017

Teamwork makes the dream work!

“The day was spent on the river floating (aka hard paddling!) down to Rasar State Park. It was inspiring to see our entire cohort working so hard even when our bodies were aching. In total, we paddled 22 miles!!! Along the way we saw a great many wonderful sights: a bald eagle eating a dead salmon, an osprey diving into the river on a hunt, many animal tracks in the mud (mink, river otter).” – Charlee Corra

Day Three – August 20, 2017

“Nested within the Skagit’s current, we travel as if a migration of waterfowl; calling to one another in formation and in floundering. What once began of the narrowly formed channel of our new home has opened expansively as valley, field and flood plain. Today’s mileage: 24.” – Zoe Wadkins

Day Four – August 23, 2017

“Today was our fourth day paddling on the Skagit, and our mileage count has now reached roughly 75 miles. Early in the day a juvenile bald eagle circled overhead of our canoes, which some people took as a good omen for the day. We noticed a “Sun-dog” encircling the sun, this phenomena appears as a perfect circular rainbow around the sun, and according to Dan (Dubie – Cohort 16) signifies there are ice crystals high up in the atmosphere.”

Launching off a gravel bar into the river.

“Along with flattening landscape came more clear signs of human development. We passed under I5 and heard the thundering sounds of cars traveling 70 miles per hour… A salmon so large jumped out of the water that Kira was convinced it was a shark. Soon we entered agricultural land; tonight we are camped at Viva Farms.” – Nate Trachte

Day Five – August 26, 2017

“Traveling the extent of a river by canoe was a spiritual and gentle way of moving. It allowed us to really see the landscape and experience such an incredibly diverse region. Along this journey, we also got to know the landscape of our cohort, all the tears and giggles, along with the acknowledgement of what is still to come. I have so much confidence in our group and look forward to understanding more about what Larry Campbell means by dig deep.” – Ashley Hill

Cohort 17 standing shin-deep in the Salish Sea after 80+ miles of paddling from freshwater to saltwater!

To see more pictures from the summer course, check out our Flickr page!

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